Skip to content. | Skip to navigation


Personal tools
You are here: Faculty of Social Sciences > Sociology Homepage > People > Jeffrey Denis

Jeffrey Denis

Jeffrey Denis

Jeffrey Denis

Tenure-track; Assistant Professor

Full-Time Faculty

Areas of Interest


Research Interests

    My research investigates the social processes that shape the well-being of historically marginalized communities and the strategies, alliances, policies and practices that can bring about more just and sustainable societies. I am currently engaged in three major projects:

    1. Canada at the Crossroads is a forthcoming book about Indigenous-settler relations in Northwestern Ontario (Treaty 3 Territory). Based on 18 months of fieldwork, 160 in-depth interviews, and a photovoice project with Anishinaabe, Métis, and non-Indigenous residents, this book examines the construction and negotiation of group identities, the key sources of intergroup conflict and cooperation (“boundaries” and “bridges”) and the dynamics of racism and anti-racism in a contemporary small-town settler-colonial setting. 

    2. Pathways to Being an Ally: Building on the above research, I am conducting life-history interviews with settler-Canadians who have participated in Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Idle No More events. My goal is to understand the experiences and conditions that lead to engagement in solidarity activities. In other words, how do some settlers become “allies,” and how do they conceive of their roles in reconciliation and decolonization? 

    3. Action Research on Social Determinants of Health: I am also a collaborator on two CIHR-funded projects broadly concerned with poverty and health in Indigenous communities. The Poverty Action Research Project (PARP) involves working with five First Nation communities across Canada to develop poverty reduction and community development strategies and monitor the long-term impacts on health and well-being. The Two-Eyed Seeing Project is a partnership with 13 Mi’kmaq communities in Nova Scotia to document the causes and consequences of poverty and develop a new, culturally appropriate social policy framework, blending the best of both Indigenous and Western knowledge. More generally, I have an abiding interest in the social determinants of health and citizen participation in decision-making, sparked by earlier research on the transformation and closure of the Wellesley Hospital in downtown Toronto.


    Research Grants

    2010-2017: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health, Aboriginal Health Intervention Research Grant ($2.5 million): “A Poverty Reduction Approach to Improving the Health and Well-Being of First Nation Communities,” Co-Investigator (PI: Dr. Frederic Wien, Dalhousie University, in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations)

    2013-2016: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Open Operating Grant ($446,395): “Building a Social Policy Framework for the Health and Well-Being of Mi’kmaq Communities: A Two-Eyed Seeing Approach,” Co-Investigator (PI: Dr. Frederic Wien, Dalhousie University, in partnership with the Kwilmu'kw Maw-klusuaqn Negotiation Office (KMKNO))

    2012-2014: McMaster University, Standard Research Grant, Arts Research Board ($7,000): “Pathways to Being an Ally: How Some Non-Indigenous Canadians Embrace Reconciliation,” Principal Investigator 

    2009-2010: National Science Foundation, Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant ($10,000): “Native and Non-Native Group Interactions,” Principal Investigator



    • Ph.D., Harvard University, 2011



    Selected Publications


    Denis, Jeffrey S. 2015. “Contact Theory in a Small-Town Settler-Colonial Context: The Reproduction of Laissez-Faire Racism in Indigenous-White Canadian Relations.” American Sociological Review 80(1): 218-242.

    Denis, Jeffrey S. 2012. “Transforming Meanings and Group Positions: Tactics and Framing in Anishinaabe-White Relations in Northwestern Ontario, Canada.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 35(3): 453-470.


    Denis, Jeffrey S. 2015. Canada at the Crossroads: Boundaries, Bridges, and Laissez-Faire Racism in Indigenous-Settler Relations. [Under review] 

    Goyette, David, Dennis William Magill, and Jeff Denis (Editors). 2006. Survival Strategies: The Life, Death, and Renaissance of a Canadian Teaching Hospital. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press. 


    Denis, Jeffrey S. 2014. "A Four Directions Model: Understanding the Rise and Resonance of an Indigenous Self-Determination Movement.” Forthcoming in More Will Sing their Way to Freedom: Indigenous Resistance and Resurgence, edited by Elaine Coburn. Halifax: Fernwood Press.

    Denis, Jeffrey S. 2011. “Bridging Understandings: Anishinaabe and White Perspectives on the Residential School Apology and Prospects for Reconciliation.” Pp. 257-262 in Reading Sociology: Canadian Perspectives, 2nd edition, edited by Lorne Tepperman and Angela Kalyta. Don Mills, ON: Oxford University Press.


    Clair, Matthew, and Jeffrey S. Denis. 2015. “Sociology of Racism.” Pp. 857-863 in International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition, edited by James D. Wright. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.

    Denis, Jeffrey S. 2013. “Us, Them, and Others, and the Missing Cornerstone of Colonization.” Journal of International Migration and Integration [Book review, published online December 22; DOI: 10.1007/s12134-013-0311-7]

    Denis, Jeff. 2012. “Why ‘Idle No More’ Is Gaining Strength, and Why All Canadians Should Care.” Toronto Star, Opinion/Editorial, December 20, 2012.  []


    Document Actions